Bandeau d'identification visuelle du Ministère de la sécurité publique
Ministère de la Sécurité publique

Report of the Task Force on Crime Prevention

Introduction

Over $3.5 billion! Crime costs us at least that much every year in Québec. Nearly $2.5 billion are earmarked for prisons, police and the criminal justice system. At least another billion is spent on private security services.

And these are only a few of the visible costs, which are relatively easy to measure. If the property losses of victims, insurance premiums, medical expenses, the cost of home security systems and all the other hidden costs were added, by how much would that amount have to be multiplied?

In any case, we would still only have a vague picture of the costs generated by crime. How can we quantify the fear, the lives destroyed and the acts of vengeance? How can we measure the consequences of the mistrust that undermines social relations? What are the links between crime, the deterioration of our cities and economic development?

The rise in crime gives rise to a growing anxiety about our quality of life and the future development of society. To many of us, violence seems all-pervasive and the protection of people and property ever more difficult to ensure. Rightly or wrongly, fear becomes the daily lot of an increasing number of our fellow citizens.

Yet, we've refined our instruments for analysing crime and we better understand the factors that foster it. New approaches are being found and experiments focusing on prevention are becoming more and more frequent.

In this context, the mandate entrusted to the Task Force on Crime Prevention by the Minister of Public Security takes on a double significance. On the one hand, it testifies to our failure to curb crime and the insecurity it breeds. But on the other, it banks on the tremendous hope raised over the past few years by heightened awareness of the possibility and necessity of acting more effectively and at lesser cost, before the damage is done.

1. Mandate and Operation of the Task Force

Judging that it had become necessary and urgent to take stock of the situation and to bring together all those involved, the Minister of Public Security, Mr. Claude Ryan, announced in February 1992, at the conclusion of the Sommet de la Justice, his intention to create a Task Force on Crime Prevention. Following preliminary meetings and consultations, the Task Force was set up in August 1992.

It is made up of representatives from some 40 organizations involved in various ways in crime prevention: municipalities, community and school organizations, universities, police departments, police unions, government departments and agencies. The complete membership of the Task Force is listed in Appendix I: Membership of the Task Force on Crime Prevention.

According to the Minister's directives:

"The mandate of the Task Force is to supply the Minister of Public Security with ideas and recommendations for the purpose of drafting a crime prevention policy in keeping with the responsibilities conferred upon the Minister by law.

The Task Force shall base its work on recognized principles and trends. It is important, for example, to broach crime prevention by highlighting community and multi-sectoral approaches, by taking into consideration a number of particular problems such as the safety of women, children and the elderly, intercultural issues, multiple substance abuse and urban crime. The principles established in the Montréal Declaration should also be considered.

To this end, the Task Force shall notably:

  1. Identify crime prevention needs, taking into consideration the special features of communities and regions.
  2. List and assess the work accomplished by those involved, especially those active within the field of the ministère de la Sécurité publique.
  3. Identify the causes of crime, with a view to possible preventive action.
  4. Gather the opinions of experts and examine policies and experiments from outside Québec, in order to identify the factors that promote the implementation of prevention programmes and those which are detrimental to their development.
  5. Identify the contribution expected of those working within the field of the ministère de la Sécurité publique.

    Among those whose contribution could be examined are:
    • the Direction générale de la sécurité et de la prévention;
    • police forces;
    • the Services correctionnels and the Commission québécoise des libérations conditionnelles;
    • volunteer and community organizations;
    • regional crime prevention committees;
      • the Institut de police du Québec and educational institutions providing training in criminology and police techniques;

       

  • Identify the contribution expected of those whose action is not directly within the field of the ministère de la Sécurité publique, but whose role is deemed essential.

    Among these parties are:
    • the family;
    • school boards and educational institutions;
    • socially-oriented volunteer and community organizations;
    • businesses, including insurers;
    • municipalities, notably Montréal;
    • the media;
    • the ministère de l'Éducation
    • the ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur et de la Science;
    • the ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux;
    • the ministère de la Justice;
    • the ministère des Communautés culturelles et de l'Immigration;
    • the ministère de la Main-d'œuvre, de la Sécurité du revenu et de la Formation professionnelle.

 

  • Identify the beast means for developing a policy.

 

  • Identify the nature and possible functions of the organizational structure that could be required to ensure the stability, continuity, effectiveness and coherence of action on the provincial, regional and municipal levels".
    (Québec, ministre de la Sécurité publique, 1992)

 

To carry out its mandate on schedule and to ensure its smooth operation, the Task Force set up an Executive Committee to oversee the entire operation. It also crated sub-committees responsible for specific matters. Finally, it was able to count on the collaboration of the Direction générale de la sécurité et de la prévention, whose staff assumed responsibility for secretarial duties and the preparation of this report.

The Task Force consulted numerous and varied sources during the course of its work. It carried out consultations intended to enable it to obtain the opinions of the largest possible number of citizens and organizations. Twelve organizations and individuals, listed in Appendix II: Organizations Consulted and/or Having Submitted Briefs, submitted briefs. Representatives of the Task Force took part in five regional meetings, in Mauricie, Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, Outaouais, Laval-Laurentides-Lanaudière and Montérégie. These activities were organized by regional crime prevention committees at the request of the Task Force, and they were all a resounding success. As part of Crime Prevention Week 1992, nearly 1,500 persons expressed their views by responding to a questionnaire published as an advertising supplement in the print media. In addition, all the members of the Task Force had the opportunity to submit their comments in writing.

The Task Force also consulted a great deal of scientific documentation, including the findings of opinion surveys, departmental reports and reports by foreign governments and international authorities. These sources will be drawn upon throughout this report. The Task Force profited as well from the invaluable and varied expertise of its members.

2. An Approach Confirmed by Many Events

In order to put its approach into proper perspective, the Task Force wishes to underscore a number of events here and elsewhere that helped it implement its mandate and guide its reflection.

In a very general manner, the growing interest in crime prevention has benefited from the success of this type of approach in other fields such as environment and health. Increased awareness of the risk of irreparable damage and the need to use our resources more efficiently are among the factors that have helped convince us of the necessity and advantages of anticipating and preventing problems. The development of crime prevention is undeniably in step with this trend, which has gained great momentum over the past few decades and is eloquently attested to by the rapid development of the "Réseau québécois de villes et villages en santé" (Québec's healthy communities network and the recent health policy of the ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux.

2.1 Internationally

The achievements of many countries have caught the attention of the Task Force. French urban policy has won the cooperation of local prevention and urban safety boards. England has also made an important contribution to the development of situational crime prevention, which focuses on reducing the opportunities for offences to be committed. Sweden and the Netherlands are known for their research into, and evaluation of, social development strategies, and for the legal status they give crime prevention. These experiences have been major sources of inspiration and will be examined in much more detail in a later chapter.

A number of influential international events should also be mentioned. In 1989, the European and North American Conference on Urban Safety and Crime Prevention, better known as the Montréal Conference, was held under the auspices of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, the European Forum on Urban Security and the United States Conference of Mayors. Because of its major and continuing impact on crime prevention, the final declaration of this conference is quoted in full in Appendix III. The Eighth United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders endorsed the Montréal Declaration in 1990. In Paris, in 1991, the International Conference on Security, Drugs and the Prevention of Delinquency in Urban Areas followed in the footsteps of Montréal and the United Nations, and identified the conditions under which the principles established at the previous conferences could be implemented. Moreover, the Paris conference endorsed the proposed creation in Montréal of an international crime prevention centre. Shortly after the Paris conference, at the Versailles summit, the Ministers of Justice of the member countries of the United Nations recognized crime prevention as one of the three priorities of the organisation.

2.2 In Canada

Many events in Canada have furthered crime prevention, including the highly significant contribution of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the untiring work of the Canadian Criminal Justice Association. In addition, there have been the initiatives of the Solicitor General of Canada, who launched National Crime Prevention Week some 12 years ago and who instituted the Solicitor General's Crime Prevention Awards, bestowed on organizations and individuals in recognition of their achievements in this field.

In March 1993, the Canadian Minister of Justice invited to Toronto more than 250 representatives of organizations concerned by crime, in order to lay the foundations for a national prevention and safety policy. The Québec government took an active part in this meeting.

But the major recent event was undoubtedly the tabling of the report of the Standing Committee on Justice and the Solicitor General, chaired by Dr. Robert Horner and dealing with crime prevention in Canada. After hearing more than 100 witnesses, the Committee recommended, in particular, that a crime prevention policy be developed in a spirit of cooperation among federal, provincial and municipal authorities. It expressed the hope that a national crime prevention council and an international prevention centre be established. It also suggested that, within five years, 5% of the federal budget for the criminal justice system be set aside for prevention. Lastly, it felt that Parliament's determination to prevent crime must be clearly expressed through principles included in the appropriate statutes.

2.3 Québec

The development of crime prevention in Québec has gone through several stages over the last 10 years. The following represent a few of the milestones.

Starting in 1971, crime prevention committees were set up in Québec's administrative regions. Then composed solely of police officers, the committees gradually attracted people from all sectors of society. Initially centred on making police operations more effective, they then turned to experimenting with prevention programmes and encouraged greater participation of municipalities, community organizations and individuals.

The regional committees and a host of community organizations have played an essential role in an ongoing reflection on crime prevention, notably by contributing to greater government awareness.

Beginning in 1985, the matter was on the official agenda of the ministère de la Justice. A progress report of the activities of the divisions of the department was tabled, and a covering letter sent to the Deputy Minister stated: "...the future of the administration of justice is tied to the development of prevention and you have shown the determination the Conseil believes is needed in developing a departmental prevention policy...". (Québec, ministère de la Justice, 1985a, [our translation])

This determination was to be pursued by the Solicitor General, Mr. Herbert Marx, in 1988. Buttressed by a study of Québec crime, which contained a discussion of prevention and the conditions for its success, a round of consultations took the Minister to 11 cities and towns in Québec. (Québec, ministère du Solliciteur général, 1988). Following the tour, the Minister committed himself to proposing a departmental policy. He also stated that additional financial resources should be devoted to prevention, that expertise and prevention programme evaluation would be developed and that steps would be taken to encourage municipalities and all parties in society to work together more closely.

An initial draft policy, the Bérubé report, was submitted in September 1990 to the Minister of Public Security, Mr. Sam Elkas. Essentially, the draft policy attributed to the department responsibility for promoting prevention, for acting in concert with its partners, for seeing to research and development and for coordinating action. (Québec, ministère de la Sécurité publique, 1990a) Mr. Claude Ryan, the current Minister of Public Security, replaced Mr. Elkas before the latter could make known his position on the policy proposals.

In April 1990, the Direction de la prévention was created and, notably, mandated to set up a documentation centre and promote cooperation among all sectors of society. With its partners, this new division organized the first seminar on crime prevention, held in Saint-Hyacinthe on October 18 and 19, 1991. The Fédération des comités régionaux de prévention de la criminalité, Tandem Montréal, the Réseau québécois de villes et villages en santé, the Association des directeurs de police et pompiers du Québec, the Société de criminologie du Québec, the Conseil québécois du commerce de détail, the Solicitor General of Canada and the ministère de la Sécurité publique du Québec were the co-organizers. Over 300 persons from all walks of life and all regions of Québec participated. The theme of the seminar dealt specifically with the need and conditions for partnership in crime prevention.

In the meantime, a major event, the February 1992 Sommet de la Justice, was being prepared. The question of crime prevention was among the issues to be discussed. The Minister of Public Security had the opportunity to comment on the proposed adoption of a crime prevention policy, one of the recommendations stemming from the Sommet de la Justice. The Minister's message was clear: in substance, he wanted his department to establish a practical, realistic policy, based upon knowledge of the causes of crime and the most productive experiments in prevention. He was also prepared to set up a task force whose mandate would be to take stock of the situation over the past few years and make recommendations. This report constitutes the response to the Minister's request.

3. Approach Adopted by the Task force

With this support, the Task Force began to develop its own line of thought within the framework described briefly below.

3.1 Crime must be better understood

Although Québec compares favourably with the other Canadian provinces and there is much less crime here than among its American neighbours, there is no reason to be complacent. Especially since the 1960s, the official crime rates (those recorded in police statistics) have risen in a disquieting manner. Since 1974, they have doubled. Despite a lull during part of the 1980s, some figures for recent years point to a resurgence of crime. There is a particularly disturbing phenomenon: the official date on violence against persons have constantly risen and have increased almost tenfold since 1962.

Victimization and self-reported delinquency surveys show that nearly two-thirds of all crimes are never reported to the police. Although this proportion varies greatly according to the type of offence, it is undeniable that official crime statistics underestimate the real incidence of crime, particularly with regard to offences such as sexual assault, conjugal violence, theft and vandalism.

The same studies also show that the real increase in crime does not always correspond to that which is recorded in official statistics. Although violence against persons is irrefutably on the rise, it is probably increasing much more slowly than the official statistics seem to indicate. The growing intolerance of violence and awareness of its unacceptable nature have apparently increased the reporting of crime substantially more than the violence itself. By way of contrast, one might also suspect that offences such as fraud are increasing more rapidly than the official statistics show.

Whatever the crime figures may actually be and however difficult they are to assess accurately, crime also has a subjective impact. The feeling of insecurity it provokes is more and more palpable in the general population and, especially, among the elderly, among women, and in certain neighbourhoods. Whether this fear is justified or not makes no difference. It is felt, it is growing and it erodes the quality of life in our society.

The consequences of crime cannot be measured only in economic terms. Although the direct and indirect financial costs of crime are already enormous, its social costs are perhaps even greater. We unwittingly change our lifestyles, we avoid going out and barricade ourselves in our homes. Mistrust and isolation take root, neighbourhoods deteriorate and are abandoned, economic and cultural development stagnate or decline. These consequences are highly visible in a number of cities in the United States and have begun to be observed here, in some areas of our larger cities, affected by a growing urban exodus.

Although remarkable progress has been made, in health and education for example, we must acknowledge our failure to contain crime and violence. Our determination to preserve our achievements will require that high priority be given to satisfying another basic right, the right to live in safety.

3.2 Prevention is the best response

A disturbing observation must be made along with this general profile of the crime situation, and it will be dealt with in more detail in subsequent chapters. Although the number of police officers has remained relatively stable since 1975, the mushrooming costs of policing, particularly during the 1980s, and the marked recourse to legal proceedings and incarceration have not succeeded in containing crime and violence, nor in restoring the feeling of security we seek. Some might maintain that the situation would be much worse if it were not for these measures. Others might argue that the solution is to be found in this course of action and that we just need more resources.

We can however gauge the failure of this approach, among our neighbours in the United States, for example. There, the number of police officers has doubled and the number of private security firms has quadrupled over the past 30 years. The prison population has doubled in the past 10 years and has hit a record rate of four inmates per 1,000 inhabitants, which is at least four times higher than anywhere else in the Western world. But these measures have not prevented Americans from having to face rates of violence three times higher than in the other industrialized countries, and from maintaining the highest general delinquency rates by a wide margin.

It is obvious that repressive and punitive measures can only repair the damage. It must also be acknowledged that these measures have no effect on most of the factors responsible for the rise in crime. If we fail to act on these factors, the race will be even more lopsided, and repression and punishment still more ineffective.

Crime prevention seems so logical that it is easy to convince ourselves of its many advantages. Savings in public spending, enhanced quality of life, more certain economic development, a richer urban fabric and a greater feeling of security would be the obvious gains. But it is another story to learn how to make prevention work. There are many requirements: the factors that foster crime must be found, priorities must be set, appropriate means of action must be discovered, concerned parties must be identified and resources must be committed.

However, our knowledge of the causes of crime has remained scant. Although many factors associated with crime have been identified, they are highly diverse and appear to be interrelated. Whether they are socio-economic, physical, ideological, collective or individual, none of these factors is a cause per se. There is no "single cause" of crime, but a tangled web of factors that converge to produce crime, in varying proportions according to the circumstances. Hence, crime prevention requires that scores of parties act in varied, complementary and coordinated ways.

This is why the confusion surrounding the very concept of crime prevention, the eclectic action it generates and the timid policies it inspires are not surprising. The second section of this report will attempt to identify and organize the main ideas and activities in the area.

3.3 A better quality of life is the true objective

In accordance with its mandate, the Task Force focused particularly on exploring the various aspects of crime and its prevention. However, in this last part of the introductory chapter, it would like to broaden the discussion somewhat and attempt to place crime prevention in a more general perspective, that of public security as social peace.

Good examples often eliminate the need for inordinately long and convoluted arguments. Medicine is one of them. When physicians gained a greater understanding of the causes of some diseases, they were able to do more than just treat patients who had already fallen ill, or fight epidemics by quarantining people. They became able to help prevent these diseases by promoting personal and public hygiene or through vaccination campaigns. Disease prevention was born and this was a great step forward for humanity.

But we now know that any effort to prevent disease is only optimally effective in the broader framework of a health policy. Modern definitions of health extend beyond the simple absence of disease. We know that it is not enough to attack viruses or to try to prevent them; a whole series of habits that initially seem unrelated to the disease must be adopted. We also realize that if we target only the disease, it will creep back up on us later on.

The same is unquestionably true of crime. Through our greater understanding of the associated factors, we are able to work to prevent crime. This is indisputably a great step forward and we must do everything in our power to take advantage of it. But we must go a step further and forge a vision of society, all the components of which work together to promote public security.

Focusing on crime means riveting our attention only on those individuals who are most likely, in our opinion, to become criminals and on the situations that are most immediately conducive to crime. This approach is essential, but if it is not supported by a broader vision, there is a great risk that we will always lag behind more basic forces.

For obvious reasons, the ministère de la Sécurité publique cannot alone assume all the tasks that a general quality-of-live policy would require. However, within the framework of this general policy, the department has a decisive role to play regarding a public security policy.

In health matters, we have gradually learned to go beyond disease and to call on each person's sense of responsibility, in addition to the indispensable contribution of physicians and hospitals. Education has broken through the barriers of classroom training, in order to respond to each individual's need for self-realization. We are aware that, although judges and the courts ensure that the law is observed, citizen's values and attitudes are the true foundation of justice.

Notwithstanding the essential presence and work of police departments and correctional services, the ministère de la Sécurité publique must, itself, prepare to go beyond the limited world of crime. It must join the entire population in ensuring that we have public security, that fundamental ingredient of life in society.

Section I Profile of Crime in Québec

A crime is an act that society as a whole condemns and that laws prohibit us from committing. We generally seed to punish its author in the hope of discouraging him from repeating the offence, of dissuading others from committing it and of protecting the public.

Consult this section

Section II Crime Prevention: a Necessity

Crime prevention can no longer be regarded as a passing fad. Beyond the most common-sense motives, given that it's always preferable to prevent a problem from occurring, crime prevention has become a necessity for various reasons.

On the on hand, the real increase in crime and the even more rapidly growing fear that accompanies it have made crime a pressing issue among the ordinary public and politicians alike. On the other hand, despite the rising cost of maintaining police, judicial and prison services, we must acknowledge that we are powerless to curtail or even contain crime. Finally, successful preventive measures in the health sector and expanding knowledge in criminology, notably regarding factors associated with crime and conditions conducive to the commission of certain offences, have encouraged the development of diverse hypotheses and experiments.

While the very notion of prevention is hardly new, it has only recently been applied to crime. Considerable confusion still reigns concerning the nature and specific objectives of, and methods pertaining to, crime prevention. This conceptual shortcoming is exacerbated by the eclecticism, relative scarcity and sketchiness of the evaluations of field experience. Society itself is crime prevention's laboratory. Perhaps more than any other discipline, its development depends on political determination and public resources.

These problems are interrelated. If we fail to solve them, they will continue to cause immobility, defeatism, discouragement and waste. Even today, many specialists feel that crime prevention rhetoric fuels ideological discourse more than it does the application of solutions to various problems. In a nutshell, Professor Ross Hastings of the University of Ottawa has summarized a viewpoint broadly shared by Québec specialists: "The problem, as I see it, is that crime prevention has not really been tried". (Hastings, 1991)

In order to fulfill its mandate, which is precisely to help break this vicious circle, the Task Force must endeavour to shed light on the notion of crime prevention and some of its implications. In its own modest way, this chapter seeks to achieve this end.

Consult this section

Section III New Endeavours

The strategies and recommendations proposed in this chapter will focus on the following elements:

  • Areas Requiring Action
  • Conditions for Success
  • A Structure to Support the Strategies Retained

Consult this section

Conclusion

The recommandations of the Task Force are aimed, for the most part, at providing crime prevention with a solid foundation. At the grassroots level, the municipalities provide local leadership in their communities. At the top is a department that refuses to take the place of communities, but is firmly resolved to support and encourage them.

The Task Force has chosen to make recommendations that it feels are realistic. It honestly believes that it should be possible and profitable to allocate the amounts required for community prevention of crime. But one thing is certain: we must invest in crime prevention if we do not want to stand idly be while our quality of life deteriorates. The Task Force also thinks that interdepartmental co-operation is possible in achieving crime prevention objectives, and that adjustments to our social development programmes, on the basis of the main factors that are known to foster crime, could produce conclusive results within ten years.

The Task Force has been in a position to note not only the fears fuelled by crime, but also the public's deep desire for change and the importance that it attributes to prevention and quality of life. The mandate of the Task Force and the objective of a crime prevention policy expressed by the Minister have revived hope, in all milieus, that we will give ourselves the means to go beyong mere discussion. It is urgent that we act.

Bibliography

Archammbault, S.; Cartier, B.; Rizkalla, S. « Prévention communautaire du crime ». Montréal : Société de criminologie du Québec, 1990.

Baril, M. « L'envers du crime ». Les cahiers de recherches criminologiques, cahier no 2. Montéral : les Presses de l'Université de Montréal, 1984.

Baril, M. « Une nouvelle perspective : la victimologie » dans La criminologie empirique : phénomènes criminels et justice pénale. Denis Szabo et Marc LeBlanc, éditeurs. Montréal : les Presses de l'Université de Montréal, 1985.

Baril, M.; Durand, S.; Cousineau, M.-M.; Gravel, S. « Mais nous les témoins.Une étude exploratoire des besoins des témoins au Palais de justice de Montréal ». Ottawa : Ministère de la Justice du Canada, 1984. (Document de travail no 10).

Beaulieu, M. « L'intervention auprès des aînés victimisés ». Montréal : l'Association québécoise Plaidoyer-Victimes, 1992.

Biron, Louise; Rico, José Maria. « Principes de criminologie ». Montréal : Université de Montréal, École de criminologie, 1985.

Biron, Louise et al. « La délinquance des filles ». Montréal : Université de Montréal, 1980. (Groupe de recherche sur l'inadaptation juvénile, cahier no 3).

Blumstein, A.; Larson, R. "Model of a Total Criminal Justice System". « Operation Research » (April-May 1969), p. 199-232.

Borricand, Jacques. « La prévention de la criminalité en milieu urbain ». Aix-en-Provence : Institut de sciences pénales et de criminologie, 1992.

Brantingham, Paul J. : Faust, Frederick, L. "A Conceptual Model of Crime Prevention". « Crime and Delinquency ». vol. 22, no 3 (1976), p. 285-297.

Brillon, Y. "Les attitudes de la population à l'égard du système pénal : une perception négative de la justice pénale". « Revue internationale de criminologie et de police technique », vol. xxxvi, no 1 (1983), p. 76-89.

Brillon, Y.; Louis-Guérin, Christiane; Lamarche, M.-C. « Les attitudes du public canadien envers les politiques criminelles. Rapport final du Groupe de recherche sur les attitudes du public canadien envers la politique criminelle ». Montréal : Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1982.

Brodeur, J.-P. "Policier l'apparence". Compte rendu de la conférence. Colloque : "À quoi servent les usagers?". Paris : Sénat; Montréal : Centre de criminologie comparée, 1991.

Brodeur, J.-P. "Police et sécurité en Amérique du Nord : bilan des recherches récentes". Actes du colloque des 2-3 novembre 1989. « Les cahiers de la sécurité intérieure » (1989), p. 203-240.

Brodeur, J.-P. "Justice pénale et privatisation" dans « Les mécanismes de régulation sociale ». G. Boismenu et J.-J. Gleizal, éditeurs. Montréal : Boréal, 1988.

Bureau d'assurances du Canada. « Le vol d'automobiles au Québec : une automobile volée toutes les vingt minutes ». Montréal : le Bureau,  1991. (brochure).

Canada. Collège canadien de police. « La prévention criminelle dans la collectivité : pour mieux façonner l'avenir ». Actes de la Conférence internationale sur la prévention criminelle (Ottawa, 16-19 octobre 1990). Textes préparés par Donald Loree et R.W. Walker. Ottawa : Collège canadien de police, 1991.

Canada. Commission de réforme du droit. « Perquisition, fouille et saisie : les pouvoirs des agents de sécurité du secteur privé ». Ottawa : Approvisionnements et Services Canada, 1980. (Document d'étude, série droit pénal). Publié aussi en anglais sous le titre : « Search and Seizure : Powers of Private Security Personnel ».

Canada. Gendarmerie Royale du Canada. « La loi et l'ordre dans la démocratie canadienne ». Ottawa : GRC, 1952.

Canada. Gendarmerie Royale du Canada. « La réduction des occasions d'actes criminels : guide pour les policiers ». Ottawa : GRC, 1985.

Canada. Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes. « La violence à la télévision : état des connaissances scientifiques ». Textes préparés par Andrea Martinez. Ottawa : le Conseil, 1991. Publié aussi en anglais sous le titre : Scientific Knowledge about Television Violence.

Canada. Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes. « Synthèse et analyse de divers travaux relatifs à la violence à la télévision ». Textes préparés par Dave Atkinson et Marc Gourdeau sous la direction de Florian Sauvageau (IQRC). Ottawa : le Conseil, 1991. Publié aussi en anglais sous le titre : « Summary and Analysis of Various Studies on Violence and Television ».

Canada. Groupe d'étude sur le maintien de l'ordre dans les réserves indiennes. « Rapport du maintien de l'ordre dans les réserves indiennes : rapport du groupe d'étude ». Ottawa : Affaires indiennes et du Nord Canada, 1990.

Canada. Ministère de la Justice. « An Inventory of Federal Crime Prevention Activities ». Document de travail. Ottawa : le Ministère, 1993.

Canada. Ministère de la Justice. « Prévention du crime et traitement des délinquants ». Ottawa : le Ministère, 1990.

Canada. Ministère de la Justice. « Recueil de ressources sur les expériences canadiennes : prévention du crime et traitement des délinquants ». Ottawa : le Ministère, 1990.

Canada. Ministère de la Santé et du Bien-être social « Grandir ensemble ». Ottawa : le Ministère, 1992.

Canada. Solliciteur général du Canada. « Le coût de l'administration de la justice et de la criminalité ». Ottawa : Information Canada, 1971.

Canada. Solliciteur général du Canada. « Ensemble pour la prévention du crime : manuel du praticien ». Ottawa : le Ministère, 1983a.

Canada. Solliciteur général du Canada. « Sondage canadien sur la victimisation en milieu urbain ». Bulletin no 1 et s. Ottawa : Solliciteur général, 1983b.

Canada. Solliciteur général du Canada. « Rapport annuel 1990-1991 ». Ottawa : Approvisionnements et Services Canada, 1991.

Canada. Solliciteur général du Canada. Division de la recherche. « Amerindian Police Crime Prevention. Textes préparés par Mary Hyde et Carol Laprairie. Ottawa : le Solliciteur, 1987.

Canada. Solliciteur général du Canada. Groupe de la recherche et de la statistique. »Quelques tendances de la justice pénale canadienne. Ottawa : le Ministère, 1984.

Canada. Solliciteur général du Canada. « Une vision de l'avenir de la police au Canada : Police-Défi 2000. Document de soutien ». Ottawa : le Ministère. 1990.

Canada. Statistique Canada. « Profil de la victimisation au Canada ». Textes préparés par Vincent F. Sacco et Holly Johnson. Ottawa : Statistique Canada, 1990.

Canada. Statistique Canada. Centre canadien de la statistique juridique. "Les crimes contre les biens chez les adolescents au Canada". « Juristat », vol. 12, no 14 (août 1992). (Document bilingue).

Canada. Statistique Canada. Centre canadien de la statistique juridique. "Les différences entre les victimes de crimes de violence, selon le sexe". « Juristat », vol. 12, no 21 (novembre 1992). (Document bilingue).

Canada. Statistique Canada. Centre canadien de la statistique juridique. "Effectif policier et dépenses au chapitre des services de police au Canada, 1991". « Juristat », vol. 12 no 20 (octobre 1992). (Document bilingue).

Canada. Statistique Canada. Centre canadien de la statistique juridique. "L'homicide au Canada, 1991". « Juristat », vol. 12, no 18 (octobre 1992) (Document bilingue).

Canada. Statistique Canada. Centre canadien de la statistique juridique. "L'homicide au sein de la famille". « Juristat », vol. 9 no 1 (mai 1989). (Document bilingue).

Canada. Statistique Canada. Centre canadien de la statistique juridique. "Statistiques sur les tribunaux de la jeunesse, faits saillants de 1991-1992". « Juristat », vol. 12, no 16 (septembre 1992). (Document bilingue).

Cirel, Paul; Evans, P.; McGillis, P.; Whitcomb, D. « Community Crime Prevention Program : Seattle, Washington ». Washington, D.C : U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 1977.

Chapman, D. « Sociology and the Stereotype of the Criminal ». Londres : Tavistock, 1968.

Clarke, Ronald V. « Situational Crime Prevention : Successful Case Studies ». New York : Harrow and Heston, 1992.

Conférence de Montréal sur les femmes et la sécurité urbaine. « J'accuse la peur ». Actes de la Conférence (Montréal, 1992). Textes préparés par Claire Varin. Montréal : C.U.M., 1992.

Conférence européenne et nord-américaine sur la sécurité et la prévention de la criminalité en milieu urbain. « Déclaration finale de la Conférence ». Montréal : la Conférence, 1989.

Conférence internationale sur la sécurité, les drogues et la prévention de la délinquance en milieu urbain. « Actes de la Conférence ». Paris : la Conférence, 1991.

Conklin, J.E. « The Impact of Crime ». New-York : Macmillan, 1975.

Cousineau, Marie-Marthe. "Le crime, la justice et les personnes âgées". « Les cahiers de recherches criminologiques », cahier no 7. Montréal : Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1987.

Cousineau, Marie-Marthe; Laberge, D.; Théorêt, B. « Prisons et prisonniers : une analyse de la détention provinciale durant la dernière décennie ». Montréal : Université du Québec à Montréal; Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1988. (Groupe de recherche et d'analyse sur les politiques et les pratiques pénales, cahier no 1).

Cousineau, Marie-Marthe; Normandeau, André. « Les coûts sociaux et économiques de la criminalité ». Montréal : Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1992.

Communauté urbaine de Montréal. « La police à l'heure de la concertation : recueil des conférences du Colloque. Actes du Colloque » (Montréal, 16-18 septembre 1990). Textes établis et revus par Johanne Doin et Marie-France Gamache. Montréal : C.U.M.; S.P.C.U.M; Québec : ministère de la Sécurité publique, 1991.

Crime Concern. « Family, School and Community : Towards a Social Crime Prevention Agenda », Swindon : Crime Concern, 1992.

Curtis, L.A. « American Violence and Public Policy ». New Haven, CT : Yale University Press, 1985.

Cusson, Maurice. « L'analyse criminologique de la prévention situationnelle ». Montréal : Université de Montréal, École de criminologie, 1992.

Cusson, Maurice. « Croissance et décroissance du crime ». Paris : Presses universitaires de France, 1990.

Dankwort, Jürgen. "« Détourner la violence conjugale? Vers une intervention efficace auprès des hommes violents »" dans Des hommes et du masculin. Lyon : Presses universitaires de Lyon, 1992.

"Des communautés plus sûres : une stratégie sociale de prévention du crime au Canada". « Revue canadienne de criminologie (numéro spécial »), vol. 31, no 4 (1989).

van Dijk, J.J.-M.; Mayhew, Pat; Killias, Martin. « Experiences of Crime Across the World : Key Findings from the 1989 International Crime Survey. » (2e édition) Deventer : Kluwer Law and Taxation Publishers, 1991.

Van Dijk, J. « La politique des prévention des Pays-Bas" »dans La prévention de la criminalité urbaine. Aix-en-Provence : Presses universitaires d'Aix-Marseilles, 1992.

Dumas, Marthe. « Le chiffre noir de la victimisation chez les jeunes ». Saint-Jérôme : l'Antre-Jeunes Inc., 1990.

Durand, S. « L'analyse de la peur du crime au moyen de la "carte mentale" ».  1981. Thèse de maîtrise en criminologie, Université de Montréal, École de criminologie.

Eisenhower Foundation. « Youth Investment and Community Reconstruction : Street Lessons on Drugs and Crime for the Nineties ». Washington. D.C. : la Fondation, 1990.

États-Unis. President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice. « The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society : A report by the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice ». Washington, D.C. : U.S. Government Printing Office, 1967. Président : Nicholas de B. Katzenbach.

Revue canadienne de criminologie, Vol. 31, no 4 (1989), p. 464-476.

Farrington, David P. "Age and crime" dans « Crime and Justice », Michael Tonry and Norval Morris, éditeurs. Chicago : University of Chicago Press. vol. 7 (1986), p. 189-250.

Fédération canadienne des municipalités. « Pour des villes plus sûres ». Ottawa : la Fédération, 1992.

Figgie, H.E. « The Figgie Report on Fear of Crime : America Afraid. Part I : The General Public. » Willoughby, Ohio : A.T.O. Inc., 1980.

Fondation de la recherche sur les toxicomanies. « Les stratégies et les concepts essentiels. » Toronto : la Fondation, 1986.

Forum des collectivités territoriales européennes pour la sécurité urbaine. « Villes en sécurité : prévention de la délinquance, des drogues et de la toxicomanie. » Paris : le Forum, 1992.

Fourcaudot, Martine. « Étude descriptive sur les agences de sécurité privée au Québec ». 1988. Thèse de maîtrise en criminologie, Université de Montréal, École de criminologie.

Fourcaudot, Martine : Prévost, Lionel. « Prévention de la criminalité et relations communautaires. » Sherbrooke : Les Éditions Modulo, 1991.

France. Commission des maires sur la sécurité. « Face à la délinquance, prévention, répression, solidarité : rapport Bonnemaison au Premier Ministre. » Paris : la Commission, 1982.

France. Direction de la prévention à la délégation interministérielle de la ville de Paris. « Le rôle de la ville. » Textes préparés par Adeline Hazan. Paris : la Direction, 1992.

Fréchette, Marcel; LeBlanc, Marc. « Délinquances et délinquants. » Chicoutimi : Gaétan Morin, 1987.

Gariépy. J.; LeBlanc, M. « Écologie sociale et l'inadaptation juvénile à Montréal ». Montréal : Université de Montréal, École de criminologie, 1976. (Groupe de recherche sur l'inadaptation juvénile)

Garofolo, J. "The Fear of Crime : Causes and Consequences". « Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology », vol. 73, no 2v(1979), p. 80-97.

Grande-Bretagne. Home Office. « British Crime Survey x. Londres :HMSO, 1992.

Grande-Bretagne. Standing Conference on Crime Prevention. « Safer Communities »: The Local Delivery of Crime Prevention Through the Partnership Approach. Londres, HMSO, 1991.

Grande-Bretagne. Standing Conference on Crime Prevention. « Partnership in Crime Prevention ». Londre, H'SO, 1991.

Grande-Bretagne. Standing Conference on Crime Prevention. « Practical Ways to Crack Crime . Londres, HMSO, 1992.

Graham, John. « Crime Prevention Strategies in Europe and North America ». Helsinki : Heuni, 1990.

Grenier, H.; Manseau, H. « Les petits commerçants victimes de vol à main armée ». Montréal : Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1977. (Groupe de recherche et d'analyse criminologiques, rapport no 5).

Hakanson, Marianne. « "Le Conseil suédois de prévention de la délinquance et la politique suédoise en matière de prévention de la criminalité" » dans La prévention de la criminalité urbaine. Aix-en-Provence. Presses universitaires d'Aix-Marseilles, 1992.

Hamelin, M. « Les coûts sociaux du système pénal pour les femmes justiciables ». 1986. Thèse de maîtrise en criminologie, Université de Montréal, École de criminologie.

Hastings, Ross. "An Ounce of Prevention.". « The Journal of Human Justice », vol. 3, no 1 (1991), p. 85-95.

Hazan, Adeline. « "Le rôle de la ville" » dans La prévention de la criminalité urbaine. Aix-en-Provence : Presses universitaires d'Aix-Marseilles, 1992.

Himelfarb, A. « Les coûts du crime pour les victimes : conclusions provisoires du sondage canadien sur la victimisation en milieu urbain ». Ottawa : Ministère du Solliciteur général du Canada, 1984.

Institut Gamma. « Vision 2000 : Analyse des tendances à long terme. Plan stratégique du SPCUM 1991-1996 ». Montréal : l'Institut, 1990.

Institut québécois d'opinion publique. « La perception de la sécurité publique au Québec ». Québec : l'Institut, 1992.

Institut Polytechnique Ryerson. « Une enquête nationale sur le mauvais traitement des personnes âgées au Canada ». Toronto : l'Institut; Ottawa : J. Phillips Nicholson, Policy and Management Consultants; Durham : University of New Hampshire, 1990.

Koeppel, Barbara. "A Company town Decays"dans "A Hedgehog Proposal" (Margaret B. Phillips). « Crime and Delinquency », vol. 37, no 4 (1991), p. 555-574.

Ksenwski, M. « Le coût du crime : problèmes de schémas et méthodes ». Montréal : Université de Montréal, École de criminologie, 1977. (Diffusion restreinte).

Lamarche, M.-C.; Brillon, Y. « Les personnes âgées de Montréal face au crime : une recherche qualitative ». Montréal : Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1983.

Landreville, P.; Pires, A.P.; Blankevoort, V. « Les coûts sociaux du système pénal ». Montréal : Université de Montréal, 1981.

Laycock, Gloria. « "La première unité gouvernementale de la prévention de la criminalité" » dans La prévention de la criminalité urbaine. Aix-en-Provence, Presses universitaires d'Aix-Marseilles, 1992.

Le Blanc, Marc. et al. « Évaluation de Boscoville : projet de recherche. » Montréal : Université de Montréal, Groupe de recherche sur l'inadaptation juvénile, 1973.

Le Blanc, Marc; Fréchette, Marchel. « Male Criminal Activity from Childhood Trhough Youth : Mutilevel and Developmental Perspectives. » New York : Springer-Verlag, 1989.

Lecor, J. "La peur du crime, dépossession de soi". « Criminologie », vol. XVI, no 1 (1983), p. 101-103.

Levens, B.R.; Dutton, D.G. « Le rôle de service social de la police - l'intervention lors de conflits domestiques ». Ottawa : Approvisionnements et Services Canada, 1980.

Loeber. R.; Dishion. T.J. "Early Predictors of Male Delinquency". « Psychological Bulletin », vol. 94 (1983), p. 68-69.

Louis-Guérin, Christiane. "Les réactions sociales au crime : peur et punitivité". « Revue française de sociologie », vol. 25, no 4 (1984), p. 623-635.

Manseau, H. « Les vols à main armée tels que vus par des victimes ». Montréal : Université de Montréal, École de criminologie, 1980.

Martin, J.-P.; Bradley, J. "Design of a Study of Crime". « Research and Methodology ». Current Survey, 1964 (Tiré à part).

Midwest Center for Labor Research, « Social Cost Analysis of Possible Shutdown of Chrysler Plant 1, Fenton, Mo. » Textes préparés pour The St-Louis Labor Religious Community Coalition. chicago : The Center, 1990.

Morissette, A. « Les réactions et les conséquences chez la victime d'un vol à main armée ». Montréal : Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1985, (Groupe de travail sur les vols à main armée, rapport technique no 11).

Morris, N. « Prisoners and Their Families. » London : Allen and Unwin, 1965.

National Crime Prevention Council. « Planning to Stop Crime in Our Cities ». Washington, D.C. : The Council, 1987.

National Crime Prevention Council. « The Success of Community Crime Prevention ». Whashington, D.C. : The Council, 1987.

National Research Council. « Understanding and Preventing Violence ». A. J. Reiss et Jeffrey Roth, éditeurs. Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, 1993.

Néron, J. « La gestion pénale des cas de non paiement d'amende : l'usage détournée de la prison ». Montréal : Université du Québec à Montréal et Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1988. (Groupe de recherche et d'analyse sur les politiques et les pratiques pénales, cahier no 3).

Normandeau, André; Pinsonneault, Pierre. « Le vol à main armée à Montréal : les voleurs parlent, les victimes se prononcent ». Montréal : Centre international de criminologie comparée, 1985, (Groupe de travail sur les vols à main armée : rapport final no 5).

Normandeau, André; Rico, José Maria. « " La criminalité au Québec 1960-1985 : tendances et configurations" » dans La criminologie empirique au Québec : phénomènes criminels et justice pénale. Montréal : les Presses de l'Université de Montréal, 1985.

Normandeau, André. « "L'avenir de la police communautaire au Canada" » dans La prévention de la criminalité urbaine. Aix-en-Provence : Presses universitaires d'Aix-Marseille, 1992.

Normandeau, André; Hasenpusch, Burkard. "Stratégie de prévention du crime au Canada". « Revue internationale de criminologie et de police technique », vol. 33, no 1 (1980), p. 9-20.

Organisation des Nations Unies. Assemblée générale. « Prévention de la délinquance en milieu urbain. »Résolution adoptée à la huitième Conférence des Nations Unies pour la prévention du crime et le traitement des délinquants. New-York : ONU, 1990. A/CONF.144/28. 5 octobre.

Organisation des Nations Unies. Huitième Congrès des Nations Unies pour la prévention du crime et le traitement des délinquants. « Prévention du crime et justice pénale dans le contexte du développement : réalités et perspectives (La Havane, Cuba) ». New-York : ONU, 1990.

Organisation des Nations Unies. Conseil économique et social. « Rapport de la Commission pour la prévention du crime et la justice pénale sur les travaux de la première session ». Vienne : ONU, 1992, (E/1992/30), 8 juin.

Ouimet, Marc. « "Les tendances de la criminalité apparente et de la réaction judiciaire au Québec de 1962 à 1990" » dans La criminalité empirique au Québec. 2e édition (à paraître). Montréal : les Presses de l'Université de Montréal, 1993.

"La peur du crime". « Criminologie », « (numéro spécial) », Vol. XVI, no 1 (1983), p. 3-110.

"Le portrait d'une génération en devenir : les adolescents préfèrent l'amitié à l'argent et font plus confiance aux policiers qu'à leurs professeurs". « Le Devoir », 23 octobre 1992, p. A3.

Québec (Province). Assemblée nationale. « Journal des débats ». 32e législature, vol. 26. Québec : Assemblée nationale, 1982.

Québec (Province). Commission québécoise des libérations conditionnelles. « Rapport annuel 1990/1991 ». Québec : Les Publications du Québec, 1991.

Québec (Province). Commission des droits de la personne. Comité d'enquête sur les relations entre les corps policiers et les minorités visibles et ethniques. « Enquête sur les relations entre les corps policiers et les minorités visibles et ethniques : rapport final ». Montréal : la Commission, 1988. Président : Jacques Bellemare.

Québec (Province). Conseil exécutif. Secrétariat à la famille. « Familles en tête : Deuxième Plan d'action en matière de politique familiale » 1992-1994. Québec : le Secrétariat, 1992.

Québec (Province). Groupe de travail sur la lutte contre la drogue. « Rapport du Groupe de travail sur la lutte contre la drogue. » Québec : Les Publications du Québec, 990. Président : Mario Bertrand.

Québec (Province). Ministère de l'Éducation. « Prévenir et contrer la violence à l'école : Document d'information ». Québec : le Ministère, 1988.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Justice. « Politique d'intervention en matière conjugale ». Québec : le Ministère, 1986.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Justice. « Prévention : dépôt des bilans des directions ». Québec : le Ministère, 1985a.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Justice. Direction générale de la sécurité publique. « Projet pour une politique ministérielle en matière de prévention de la criminalité ». Québec : le Ministère, 1985b.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Justice. Direction générale des services judiciaires. « Rapport d'activités 1990-1991. » Québec : Les Publications du Québec, 1991.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux. Comité sur les abus exercés à l'endroit des personnes âgées. « Vieillir.en toute liberté : rapport du Comité sur les abus exercés à l'endroit des personnes âgées ». Québec : le Ministère, 1989.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux. Groupe d'experts sur les personnes aînées. « Vers un nouvel équilibre des âges : rapport final ». Québec : le Ministère, 1991a. Président : Jean Pelletier.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux. Groupe de travail pour les jeunes. « Un Québec fou de ses enfants : Rapport du Groupe de travail pour les jeunes ». Québec : le Ministère, 1991b. Président : Camil Bouchard.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux. Groupe de travail sur l'évaluation de la Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse. « La protection de la jeunesse : plus qu'une loi. Rapport du groupe de travail ». Québec : le Ministère, 1992b. Président : Honorable Michel Jasmin.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux. Groupe de travail sur l'application des mesures de protection de la jeunesse. « La protection sur mesure : un projet collectif : rapport du Groupe de travail sur l'application des mesures de protection de la jeunesse ». Québec : Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, Direction générale de la prévention et des services communautaires, 1991c. Président : Jean Harvey.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux. « La politique de la santé et du bien-être ». Québec : le Ministère, 1992a.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. « Énoncé de politique ministérielle en matière de prévention de la criminalité : projet ». Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, août 1990a.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Comité ministériel de lutte à la drogue. « Proposition d'un cadre de réflexion au sujet de la prévention des toxicomanies. Document de travail ». Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1992.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. « Pour une meilleure qualité de vie à l'aube du 21e siècle ». Textes préparés par Michèle Désy-Martin. Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1989.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. « Rapport annuel 1990-1991 ». Québec : Les Publications du Québec, 1991a.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Direction générale de la sécurité et de la prévention. « Au moment de prendre position dans la lutte à la toxicomanie, proposition pour une politique ministérielle de prévention de la criminalité ». Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1990b.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Direction générale de la sécurité et de la prévention. « Consultation ministérielle sur la prévention du crime, 11 octobre au 14 novembre 1998 :  rapport de tournée ». Textes préparés par Eve Rey. Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1988.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Direction des affaires policières. « Données de l'administration des corps de police municipaux, année 1991 ». Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1992a.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Direction des affaires policières. « État de la criminalité au Québec en 1991 : comparaisons avec 1990 et évolution de 1987 à 1991. » Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1992b.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Direction des affaires policières. « Statistiques 1991, criminalité et application des règlements de la circulation au Québec : rapport préliminaire. »Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1992d.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Direction générale des services correctionnels. Direction de la probation. « Rapport annuel 1990-91. » Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1992b.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Groupe de travail sur les relations entre les communautés noires et le Service de police de la Communauté urbaine de Montréal. « Une occasion d'avancer : rapport du Groupe de travail. » Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1992c.

Québec (Province). Ministère de la Sécurité publique. Table ronde sur la prévention de la criminalité. Questionnaire destiné au public : Résultats. Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1992e.

Québec (Province). Ministère des Finances. « Comptes publics, 1990-1991 : états financiers du gouvernement du Québec, année financière terminée le 31 mars 1991. »Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, 1991.

Québec (Province). Ministère du Solliciteur général. « Document de consultation préalable à l'adoption d'une politique ministérielle en matière de prévention de la criminalité. »Sainte-Foy, (Québec) : le Ministère, juin 1988.

Rosenbaum, Dennis P. « Community Crime Prevention ». Newbury Park, Cal. : Sage, 1986.

Rosenbaum, Dennis P.; Heath, L. "The 'Pshyco-Logic' of Fear Reduction and Crime Prevention Programs". « Applied Social Psychology Annual. » J. Edwards, E. Posavac, S. Tindel, F. Bryant et L. Heath, éditeurs. New-York : Plenum, vol. 9, p. 203-230.

Rosenbaum, Dennis P. "The Theory and Research behind Neighborhood Watch; Is it a Sound Fear and Crime-Reduction Strategy?". « Crime and Delinquency », vol. 33 (1987), p. 103-134.

Rutter, Michael; Gilles, H. « Juvenile Delinquency : Trends and Perspectives. » Markham : Penguin, 1983.

Schneider, Hans J. (éd.). « Victim in International Perspective. »New-York : De Gruyter, 1982.

Shearing. C.D. "À la recherche d'une police communautaire : l'histoire d'un grand ensemble de Toronto". « Déviance et société », Vol. 15, no 3 (1991), p. 353-359.

Sherman, L.W.C.; Milton, C.H.; Kelly, T.V. "Policing Communities : What Works?" dans z Communities and Crime, Crime and Justice : Review of Research », A. Reiss et M. Tonry, éditeurs. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, vol. 8 (1986), p. 342-386.

Sherman, L. W. "Attacking Crime : Police and Crime Control" dans « Modern Policing, Crime and Justice : A Review of Research. » M. Tonry et N. Morris, éditeurs. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, vol. 15 (1992), p. 159-230.

Skogan, Wesley G. "Community Organizations and Crime" dans « Crime and Justice : Review of Research ». M. Tonry et N. Norris, éditeurs. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, vol. 10 (1988), p. 39-78.

Skogan, Wesley. G. « Disorder and Decline. » New-York : The Free Press, 1990.

Skogan, Wesley. G. "Fear of Crime and Neighborhhod Change " dans « Communities and Crime, Crime and Justice : Review of Research », A. Reiss et M. Tonry, éditeurs. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, vol. 8 (1986), p. 203-230.

« La société québécoise en tendances 1960-1990 ». Textes préparés sous la direction de Simon Langlois. Québec : Institut Québécois de recherche sur la culture, 1990.

Sondage Gallup les tribunaux se montrent trop cléments envers les criminels. La Presse, 16 novembre 1992, p. A9.

Stinchcombe, Arthur et al. « Crime and Punishment : Changing Attitudes in America ». San Francisco : Jossey Bass Publishers, 1980.

Tandem Montréal. « Évaluation des perceptions de la population montréalaise à l'égard du phénomène de peur ou d'insécurité en tenant compte d'expériences personnelles vécues ». Montréal : le groupe Léger & Léger, 1992.

Vallée Johanne. "Prévention du crime : penser globalement, agir localement!". « Porte ouverte : buleltin de l'Association des services de réhabilitation sociale du Québec », vol. 4, no 1 (1992), p. 3.

Van der Voort, T.H.A. "Television Violence : A Child's-Yey View". « Advances in Psychology », vol. 32 (1986). Pays-Bas : Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.

Ville d'Anjou, Opération Surveillance Anjou. « Rapport annuel ». Anjou : la Municipalité, 1992.

Walgrane, Lode. "Une tentative de clarification de la notion de prévent6ion". « Annales de Vaucresson », no 24 (1986), p. 38-48.

Waller, Irvin. « Crime Prevention in a Community Policing Context : Wroking with Citizens and Community Agencies, ». Ottawa : Ministère du Solliciteur Général, 1989b.

Waller, Irvin.« La prévention de la délinquance à l'ordre du jour. Rapport introductif ». Conférence internationale sur la sécurité, les drogues et la prévention de la délinquance en milieu urbain. Paris : la Conférence, 1991.

Waller, Irvin. « Tendances actuelles de la prévention du crime en Europe : répercussions au Canada ». Ottawa : Ministère de la Justice, 1989a.

Webber, Alan M. "Crime and Management : An Interview with New York City Commissioner Lee P. Brown". « Harvard Business Review », vol. 69, no 1 (1991), p. 110-129.

Wilson, W.J. « The Truly Disadvantaged : The Inner City, the Underclass and Public Policy ». Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1987.

Wilson, James Q.; Kelling, G. "Broken Windows : The Police Neighbourhood Safety". « The Atlantic Monthly », March 1982, p. 29-38.

Wolfgang, Marvin E.; Figlio, Robert, M.; Sellin, Thorsten. « Delinquency in a Birth Cohort ». Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1972.

Wolfgang M. E. (1982) « "Basic Concepts in Victimological Therory : Individualization of the Victim"  »dans The Victim in International Perspective. Hans J. Schneider, éditeur. New-York : de Gruyter, 1982.